PRICE: $15.00
IN STOCK
ARTIST
TITLE
Dulce (Original Soundtrack Recording)
FORMAT
CD

LABEL
CATALOG #
ABDT 010CD ABDT 010CD
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
11/6/2007

Originally released as a limited edition LP of 1000 copies in 1998, this is another mysterious soundtrack work by Sun City Girls, featuring guest appearances by Eyvind Kang, The Ruins and Jesse Paul Miller. The music flips back and forth from melodic and reflective themes to shards of noise and collective improvisation. Throw in some clarinet lounge music and spooked-out drama and you have the backdrop to a film that was never completed, explained further here from the original liner notes by Alan Bishop: "A nervous, stuttering Japanese gentleman phones me in the Fall of 1995 requesting soundtrack services from Sun City Girls for his new film project about a secret underground alien base in New Mexico most commonly referred to as 'Dulce.' The real kick for us came when our new Japanese friend finally announced his allegiance to the esoteric Aum Shinrikyo group most famous for the sarin gas poisoning in a Tokyo subway not long ago. He also professed to be a former associate of Aum technical minister Hideo Murai who was killed by a Korean hitman in April of 1995. Murai joined the Aum priesthood in 1986, becoming the head of its science unit focusing on the current state of electromagnetic weapons development including EM beams using lasers and plasma. We flew to Japan to perform a few shows in April of 1996 and a clandestine meeting was arranged with our mysterious director friend on one of our days off in the electronics district of Osaka which happened to be less than a mile from where we were staying. So Doctor Gocher and I pretended to take a souvenir-gathering stroll down the hill and met 'Hachiro Maki' (a pseudonym, I'm sure) nearby in a temple courtyard. After thirty minutes of reviewing rough cuts on his swivel-screen Hi-8 camera and discussing the necessity of anonymity in today's international fast lane, we were one million yen richer with an 8mm tape in my back pocket. Haven't heard from him since..." --Alan Bishop, 1998