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ARTIST
TITLE
Southern Man
FORMAT
12"

LABEL
CATALOG #
FEEDBACK 004EP FEEDBACK 004EP
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
1/12/2009

"The Feed.back series has never been focused on making the rare and obscure once again commercially available for record collectors and DJs to own. As demonstrated by the previous two selections, U2's Sunday Bloody Sunday and Loggins & Messina's Pathway To Glory, the Feed.back series is intended to really showcase some of the dopest as well as most urgently relevant classics of our recent times. More than just a music showcase, Feed.back highlights records that actually concern serious conditions of the modern era up to this day, both spiritual and political/material, records that speak to the everyday conditions that we live through in our day-to-day existence on this earth. Music has the potential to become something beyond personal healer, a social tool both for political organization and propaganda, but also for the necessary expression of mass frustration and collective purpose. Feed.back strives for the rejuvenation of this intent in the creation and playing of music. The 3rd edition of this series, Neil Young's Southern Man, articulates a marked disgust with the reactionary and inherently racist tendency of regional nationalism. Everyone is familiar with the alleged animosity between Young and Alabama's Lynyrd Skynyrd over the blatantly condemnatory articulation of the South's almost fascistic obsession with local heritage -- sic. blood & soil, the completely fallacious belief in a national story, a legacy of firm local traditionalism that fuels so much of the racism in the south. Past, present, and future is accounted for, and the legacy of slavery is carried on through demented 'local pride' that goes largely unquestioned, disguised as it is. Young put out a song that sought to openly and aggressively single out the violent legacy of Southern racism and its influence still operating strong within Southern social thought, refusing to let it fade away from the popular memory, just as the most influential and high-ranking of apologists were beginning to formulate and put into action the notion of equality finally achieved in the 'new America.'"