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Disc 1
01
Roy Shirley Music Field
01 :00
02
Slim Smith & The Uniques My Covnersation
01 :00
03 01 :00
04
Max Romeo Wet Dream
01 :00
05
Lester Sterling & Stranger Cole Bangarang
01 :00
06
Pat Kelly How Long
01 :00
07 01 :00
08
Bob Marley Mr. Chatterbox
01 :00
09
John Holt Stick By Me
01 :00
10
Eric Donaldson Cherry Oh Baby
01 :00
11
Delroy Wilson Better Must Come
01 :00
12
Alton Ellis Play It Cool
01 :00
Disc 2
01
Leroy Smart God Helps the Man
01 :00
02
Horace Andy You Are My Angel
01 :00
03 01 :00
04
Cornell Campbell A Dance in a Greenwich Farm
01 :00
05
The Aggrovators A Noise Place
01 :00
06
The Aggrovators A Ruffer Version
01 :00
07
U Roy & Jeff Barnes Wake the Nation
01 :00
08 01 :00
10
Jah Stitch Strickly Rockers
01 :00
ARTIST
TITLE
Reggae Going International 1967-1976
FORMAT
2LP

LABEL
CATALOG #
KSLP 029LP KSLP 029LP
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
3/17/2015

Double LP version. Housed in a gatefold sleeve. 2011 release. Describing his beginnings, Bunny "Striker" Lee recalls, "I was around the business but I didn't actually start for myself until 1967. I only had twenty pounds to give to Lynn Taitt and Lynn Taitt got four men and we did 'Music Field' with Roy Shirley [included here]. So those guys helped me when I just started." In 1969 "Wet Dream" by Max Romeo, recorded in the faster reggae style and included here, was released on Lee's Unity Records in the UK where it spent 25 weeks in the National Charts. Lee's propensity for hit-making was unprecedented and in 1969, 1970, 1971, and 1972 he was awarded the title of Jamaica's Top Producer. In 1971 he won Jamaica's first Gold Record for Eric Donaldson's "Cherry Oh Baby," which was the runaway winner in that year's Jamaican Festival Song Competition and is also included here. Together with Soul Syndicate drummer Carlton "Santa" Davis, Lee originated a new style of rhythm based on the Philadelphia disco sound termed "flying cymbals" that became known as "flyers." Lee's first hit in this new style was Johnny Clarke's interpretation of Earl Zero's "None Shall Escape the Judgment," included here, and his "flyers" rhythms dominated the scene throughout 1974 and on into 1975. His two dub albums showcasing these rhythms, King Tubby's The Roots of Dub (JRCD 035CD/JRLP 035LP) and Dub from the Roots (JRCD 036CD/JRLP 036LP), with photographs of the King at the controls of his Dromilly Avenue studio, were the first vinyl releases to promote King Tubby with music lovers both in Jamaica and internationally. As a creator of musical trends, Lee was second to none, and, for most of a decade, the rest of the business hung on his every word and tried to copy his every move. In October 2008, at Kingston's National Honours and Awards Ceremony, Lee was awarded the Order of Distinction in the rank of Officer for "more than forty years of dedicated service to the music industry." Reggae Going International 1967-1976 also includes tracks by Slim Smith & The Uniques, Val Bennett, Lester Sterling & Stranger Cole, Pat Kelly, Roland Alphonso, Bob Marley, John Holt, Delroy Wilson, Alton Ellis, Leroy Smart, Horace Andy, Cornell Campbell, The Aggrovators, U Roy & Jeff Barnes, Al Capone, I Roy, and Jah Stitch.