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Holland's deep electronic specialist Conforce releases his second full-length. Still riding high on the praise from his last EP, Dystopian Elements, Boris Bunnik has crafted another album of deep digital and authentic analog bliss. As well as on Delsin, it's appropriately classy labels like Clone and Rush Hour which have released Conforce's work in the past -- the results of which have helped mark out the man behind them as one of the day's most considered sonic craftsmen. All but one of the album tracks is new and exclusive, with "Lonely Run" the only one heard thus far, given its inclusion on the aforementioned EP. It was a track which perfectly surmised the man's musical mission -- to combine elements of futurism with real hardware, decent software and to simply go wherever it takes him, be that a landscape doused in dub, formed from a firmer techno template or built on a house groove. As such, the aptly-entitled album is a wholly immersive listen from start to finish. Operating in its own deep and subliminal world of rhythm, it goes from lateral and dubby to more upright and kicking, touching on ambient moments and the odd classist moment along the way. Rather than ten shades of the same color, Escapism investigates a number of different moods and tempos. Opener "Revolt DX," for example, suggests a lively pace, despite being drenched in echo and reverb. "Elude," meanwhile, is a more roughshod roller torn apart by blistering synths, crisp percussion and prying claps. "Shadows Of The Invisible" is a mysterious journey into the tense, unknown world of deep space, while "Aquinas Control" floats in a murky, churning and dark underwater abyss... like the album overall, it's hugely evocative stuff that bares little resemblance to the populist motifs of Chicago-this or Detroit-that. From start to finish, Escapism grabs your attention without being rushed, hurried or over-complicated. It's the sort of album which works on both headphones up-close, but also on a dancefloor at a distance, thanks to its devilish detail but palpable presence. Unsurprisingly, one of today's most reliable producers has turned in one of the year's finest albums.