PRICE: $25.00
NOT IN STOCK
NO RESTOCK ESTIMATE
ARTIST
TITLE
James Last In Los Angeles
FORMAT
LP

LABEL
CATALOG #
BB 010LP BB 010LP
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
4/15/2008

...The Legendary 1975 Record Plant Studio Sessions. The glitzy funk disco jazz fusion insider tip from 1975 is now brand new on limited vinyl. Considered by many jazz fans and DJs to be the finest album "Hansi" ever recorded, the erstwhile Well Kept Secret album now has now officially resurfaced and been retitled. James Last teamed up with arranger and producer Wes Farrell and an array of top-flight American musicians for the 1975 recording sessions in L.A.'s Record Plant Studios. Glitzy jazz/disco arrangements and on-the-money funk rhythms culminated in an orchestration which would not have been out of place in a Blaxploitation score. Original copies of the LP fetch handsome sums at record fairs and on the Internet, with tracks like "Bolero 75," "Love For Sale" and "I Can't Move No Mountains" firm favorites with cool club DJs. How did this extraordinary record come about? In the '70s, James Last was selling vast quantities of records and filling concert halls the world over. There was, however, one significant gap on the map -- the United States of America. Few in the USA had even heard of the hugely successful bandleader. Signed to Polydor, Last's desire to try out something different dovetailed nicely with his record company's ambition to conquer America. The ball started to roll, coming to a stop in L.A. where Last met Farrell and an unparalleled selection of musicians at one of the most renowned recording studios in the USA. Also credited with a role in the arrangements was keyboarder and former Elvis pianist, Larry Muhoberac. Among the musicians were sax stars Ernie Watts and Tom Scott, the guitarist Larry Carlton (Steely Dan, Crusaders), bass player Max Bennet (L.A. Express) and Jim Gordon (Derek and the Dominos) on the drums. In spite of everything, the album failed to achieve the commercial breakthrough hoped for in the USA. Meanwhile, the rest of the world did not seem ready for such a funky James Last... ensuring the album's status as both cult classic and well kept secret.