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ARTIST
TITLE
The John Baker Tapes Volume 1: BBC Radiophonics
FORMAT
CD

LABEL
CATALOG #
JBH 028CD JBH 028CD
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
8/5/2008

Subtitled: Rare & Unreleased Workshop Recordings 1963-1969. This groundbreaking release represents the first major retrospective of any BBC Radiophonic composer. The legendary BBC Radiophonic Workshop, one of the sound effects units of the BBC, was created in 1958 to produce effects and new music for radio. Sounds for programs were created by using recordings of everyday sounds such as voices, bells, gravel and other raw materials for "radiophonic" manipulations, in which audio tape could be played back at different speeds, pitches, cut and joined, or processed. The Workshop's innovations in manipulative sound is akin to those used in musique concrète, and has had a profound influence on the evolution of modern electronic music. By the early 1960s, John Baker (1937-1997) had become permanent Radiophonic staff, and one-third of the holy trinity of composers (the other two being Delia Derbyshire and David Cain), working there throughout the golden 1960s and early 1970s. The 50 tracks on volume 1 of this set represent the major body of important work he produced there, and most tracks have remained unissued, until now. Together, these tracks give an incredible, diverse and magical insight into the man and his methods of working. Rare archive recordings here reveal his production techniques and highlight his innovative trademark sounds and humor. We have jingles, themes, stings, soundtracks and soundscapes from a wide variety of BBC TV, radio and public information broadcasts, as well as exceptionally rare cues from Radiophonic non-broadcast commissions. Highlights include the proto-techno opening for "Dial M For Murder," the electro-jazz intensities of "Vendetta," the plugged-in bossa nova of "Au Printemps," and the revealing "Woman's Hour (Reading Your Letters)" archive interview. All classic stuff. As mentioned before, most of these recordings have remained either lost or unissued until now -- this really is a rare treat and a significant release for followers and fans of vintage British electronics, electroacoustic work, and for buffs of the Delaware Road output. Many of these tracks were even thought lost until they were recently discovered in (his brother) Richard Baker's archive.