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1-2 Weeks
01 14 :50
02 09 :53
03 14 :44
04 19 :52
05 13 :14
ARTIST
TITLE
Live at Mt. Fuji
FORMAT
CD

LABEL
CATALOG #
MGART 305CD MGART 305CD
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
1/22/2016

2016 repress; originally released in 2007. Manuel Göttsching's performance at the Anoyo Prism festival on Mount Fuji in Japan, April 29, 2006. High-quality recording with highly sought-after tracks including "Shuttlecock." Göttsching performed the entire concert alone, accompanied by stunning visuals by a Polish graphic artist. He dug into his back catalog, coming up with new arrangements of classic material. The album opens with "Sunrain," which was originally released on the 1976 Ashra classic New Age of Earth. Göttsching takes the familiar, hypnotic sequencer pattern in a slightly different direction and extends the piece to nearly 15 minutes. The second track, "Saint and Sinner," was originally released on Concert for Murnau (2005). Göttsching takes it a step up from its laid-back studio counterpart, adding a bluesy Clapton-esque guitar lead. "Trunky Groove" debuted at this performance, and is a showcase of the psychedelic style that was the norm for Göttsching back in his very early days in Ash Ra Tempel. A techno-style rhythm is accompanied by a long drone and intense orchestrations before giving way to an effects-drenched guitar solo. "Die Mulde" is a 20-minute excerpt from Göttsching's 1997 long-form piece of the same name (MGART 301CD). It begins with the "Die Spiegel" section of the piece and shifts into the closing "Zerfluss" movement. As with "Saint and Sinner," Göttsching adds a guitar lead that is not present in the original version. Finally, to close the album, Göttsching presents another arrangement of the classic "Shuttlecock," which was originally released on the 1977 Ashra masterwork Blackouts (SPA 14759LP). The arrangement is similar to the 1976 live version that appeared on the 1996 CD The Private Tapes Vol. 1 (later released on Joaquin Joe Claussell Meets Manuel Göttsching (MG 501CD/601LP, 2006)), but definitely has a modern twist. Göttsching's guitar playing is front and center here and is stellar -- almost like taking a trip back to the mid-'70s.