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ARTIST
TITLE
Still Living in Slavery: The Album
FORMAT
3LP+CD

LABEL
CATALOG #
BBM 001LTD-LP BBM 001LTD-LP
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
9/30/2014

Here is a special one for all the vinyl-heads and collectors out there: three remix 12"s, including all remix work (by Ron Trent, Kuniyuki, Simbad), and the dancefloor-friendly versions plus the CD sealed in a full-color sleeve. Hand-numbered. Limited to 100 pieces. Grab one while stocks last... Still Living in Slavery is Mr Raoul K's third album. It is, however, the first one that will be released on his own label, Baobab Music. He thought for quite some time about how to shift the African instruments and African rhythm structures that he uses in his production process into a more dominant, more exposed position, so he gave them a role of their own, freeing them from being bound to a groove coined by a four-to-the-floor kick-drum. While using dominating drum sounds when producing records aimed for the dancefloor seemed reasonable, they weren't needed for the storytelling concept throughout this album and are left to the remixes. As usual, Mr Raoul K worked together with artists from Africa, and on this record, Hamed Sosso, Sona Diabaté, Batakali A.K. Tenekdash and Adama Conde present their skills. His friend Kuniyuki Takashi demonstrates his talent on the flute and provides some piano, too. This album deals with aspects of inner and outer slavery. It is known that people -- whether knowingly or not -- often get into habits that start to limit their possibilities and narrow their view. Slavery is no longer people put in chains by others, but people put in chains by themselves. But only one group of the enchained will admit to their chain. Mr Raoul K's other concern is to share traditional African grooves and sounds with an audience that hasn't experienced this kind of music before. He presents an authentic surrounding that provides the listener with the chance to fall in love with the unusual rhythmic patterns, without getting trapped in neo-colonial-folkloristic stereotypes. This album stands against cultural hegemonism and commits itself to getting together without prejudice.