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The William Parker Sessionography


"Excerpt from the Introduction by Ed Hazell: 'Compiling a sessionography of the seemingly inexhaustible William Parker calls for a relentless and thorough researcher. Rarely has a musician's career been so conscientiously documented. Rick Lopez' William Parker Sessionography can take its place among the great discographical classics such as Walter C. Allen's bio-discography of Fletcher Henderson, Hendersonia and The Coltrane Reference by Lewis Porter, Chris DeVito, David Wild, Yasuhiro Fujioka, and Wolf Schmaler. Like those other encyclopedic compilations of names, locations, dates, and commentary, this one tells a story of an artist and an era as compelling as any novel and more detailed than any biography could aspire to be. Much like the music itself, this book is an act of devotion, not just to facts but to shared ideals and a shared love of beauty. it was done because it needed to be done.' This is a vast microcosm of one jazz musician that reveals the macrocosm of jazz during the period of time covered -- an extensive history of jazz through the work schedule of one profound jazz musician and his affiliations with elemental participants in the history of that time and as importantly ever more, this time. 15 years in the making. Astonishing, profound, worthy of high honors in the field of research and any all positive adjectives that can be bestowed on such a mighty creation. Just having this book in one's hands feels like holding a sacrament. And, it's beautifully printed -- front & back covers in through each of the 480 pages within. An essential reference work for now and all futures. This is a fully annotated (and generously illustrated) record of practically every time that William Parker has ever played a gig / recording session, with all and every ensemble, as band member or leader, from 1972 clear through to Vision Festival June 2014. Did I use the word "astonishing" already? This is an 8.5"x11" format, 482-page book, with 370+ illustrations, weighing in at over 3 pounds, and was private-press published in an edition of 500 copies."