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02 03 :00
03 03 :06
04
Ochieng Wa Odinga Umbok (Kenya, 1939)
03 :17
06 03 :02
07
Vengopal Chari Laughing (Madras, 1906)
01 :03
08
Jonuzi Me Shoket Vome Kaba (Tirana, 1930)
03 :17
09
Fernando Vilches & Ramon Montoya Flor De Petenera (Spain, 1933)
02 :59
10 03 :16
11 02 :52
12
Benodini Dassi Khambaj (India, 1905)
02 :32
14
Imperial Palace Band Seigaiha (Tokyo, 1903)
02 :31
15 00 :54
16 03 :03
17 03 :19
22
Fernando Farinha Descrenca (Lisbon, 1942)
03 :29
23
Gopal Chunder Singh Roy Burdwan Dist. Beggar's Song (India)
00 :55
24 02 :50
25
Surat Band (Mr. Razak's) Bagesri (India, 1911)
01 :37
26
Si Said Ben Ahmed Yemma, Yemma (Algeria)
02 :53
27 02 :36
29 02 :50
30 00 :43
ARTIST
TITLE
Sprigs Of Time: 78s From The EMI Archive
FORMAT
CD

LABEL
CATALOG #
HJR 036CD HJR 036CD
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
10/28/2008

This is the third in Honest Jon's series of albums exploring the earliest 78s held in the EMI Hayes Archive. Honest Jon's has spent the last two years delving through more than 150,000 78 records in the temperature-controlled steel vaults of EMI's Archive in Hayes, Middlesex. Following studious compilations of West African and Iraqi music of the 1920s, the latest release in the Honest Jon's Hayes Archive series is a sparkling late-summer lucky dip, Sprigs Of Time: 78s From The EMI Archive. An eccentric survey of the Hayes shelves, Sprigs Of Time is thirty tracks recorded between 1903 and 1957, everywhere from England (Percy Grainger's recording of the title song, sung by Joseph Taylor in 1908) to Japan (the bewilderingly beautiful "Seigaiha," by the Japanese Imperial Palace Band, five years earlier). Organ rolls from Georgia run alongside Tamils impersonating motorized transport, and rumba from Beirut; '40s fado sits next to the songs of Bengali beggars. As with the other Hayes releases, the tracks have been restored at Abbey Road and are beautifully presented, with extensive contemporary photographs included. There are recognizable names (Joseph Taylor, the incomparable Fairuz, Mighty Sparrow and an uncredited Rubén González, singing lead vocals on "Rumba Negra") and extraordinary oddities (Vengopal Chari's rather unfunny "Laughing" and the peculiarly affecting hand bells of "Gas All Clear"). Taken out of the library and put back on the turntable, every track here is remarkable; every one worth the saving.