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Disc 1
01
Jean-Bernard Samboue Aicha
00 :59
02
Cissé Abdoulaye Jeunesse Willa
00 :59
03
Pierre Sandwidi Yamb NeY Capitale
01 :01
04
Konde Mangue Woulouni
01 :00
05
Konde Mangue Beni Idjanako
01 :02
06
Orchestre Dafra Star Ram Passomaye
00 :59
07
Traoré Seydou Rassemblement
01 :00
08
Orchestre Les Vaudou De Flamboyant Kogo Ni Toulou
01 :30
Disc 2
01
Ama Maiga Deny Tologuelen
00 :58
02
Echo Del Africa Yiri
01 :01
03
Idy-O-Idrissa Bissongo Lebguin'wa
00 :59
04
L'Harmonie Voltaique Killa Naa Ye Killa
01 :00
05
Orchestre Volta Jazz Djougou Malola
01 :00
06
L'Harmonie Voltaique Noglem Nooma
00 :59
07
Orchestre Super Volta De La Capitale La Guitare De Tinga
01 :01
ARTIST
TITLE
Voltaique Panoramique Volume 1: Popular Music in Ouagadougou & Bobo-Dioulasso 1968-1978
FORMAT
2LP

LABEL
CATALOG #
KSRE 011LP KSRE 011LP
GENRE
RELEASE DATE
11/26/2013

Kindred Spirits presents a compilation containing 13 rare and sought-after recordings from Burkina Faso. Rich and fascinating, this release comes with extensive liner-notes and an insert with photographs of the original 7" records from which Voltaique Panoramique was compiled. Until recently, not much was known about music from Burkina Faso, formerly called the Upper Volta. It is still one of West Africa's lesser-known forms of popular music. A few years before the country changed its name to Burkina Faso, thanks to Thomas Sankara's dream for a new society, voltaic music emerged as some form of true cultural revolution. Remote, poor and isolated, Burkina Faso looked to the orchestras and artists from neighboring countries such as Mali, The Ivory Coast, Ghana, Togo, and Benin. Despite the fact that the 1960s and 1970s Upper Volta lacked a proper recording studio and record pressing plant, there was a great deal of popular music produced in the country, mostly on 45s. Located at its northern border, Niger is the only other West African country whose music stayed as isolated as the music hailing from Burkina Faso. Many of its bands and artists hail mostly from Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso. They infuse some of the rich local traditions, such as mossi dances or dioula singing with Afro-Cuban flavors, American rhythm 'n' blues, French pop, and Congolese rumba. Electric guitars and organs swirl around balafon and solid horn sections.